Tuesday, April 23, 2019
Alliance Nepal, Himshikara Socio-Cultural Society and the Nestling Trust are now in a position to work together to create a home for some of the most vulnerable children of Nepal. Alliance Nepal children home has supported by Himshikhar and the Nestling Trust’s director, Susan Hamblin from UK.Eight girls are admitted in the home and started their studies from 22 April 2019.
Wednesday, February 13, 2019
Sustainable Agriculture  Looking for a unique experience in one of the most diverse countries in Asia? Volunteering in Nepal will be a perfect choice! Stunning mountains, multicultural cuisine and a rich Buddhist culture are just a few aspects that make this country worth visiting. There are definitely many great surprises waiting for you. Agriculture is the single largest employer in Nepal, providing livelihoods for 68 percent of the population. However, many local farmers struggle to make a profit and produce an adequate supply of food for their communities. growing fruit tree in Nestling Farm As a volunteer on the Sustainable Agriculture project in Nepal, your focus is on providing support to small-scale local farmers, resulting in improved livelihoods for farming communities and more resilient and sustainable agriculture practices. This project is well suited to all volunteers, particularly if you have an interest in climate change, sustainable agriculture and livelihood, international relations, social work, development studies, and cultural studies. Volunteers with previous experience on an agricultural farm or organic farm are highly appreciated by the local community for the knowledge and skills they bring to the project. Volunteers are placed with a local family to provide assistance on a farm, learning traditional Nepalese agricultural techniques and practices while also introducing knowledge of newer farming methods and market opportunities. You can expect to be involved in tasks such as clearing land, cultivating and harvesting crops, caring for and moving livestock, and general farm maintenance. If you’re someone who loves the outdoors and you’re looking for hands-on volunteer work, this is a great option for you. There is also scope for volunteers to assist the farmers and local community with ideas on how to manage their farms from a business standpoint, with the aim of providing support to increase their financial security. Please note that volunteers should have basic knowledge in related subject areas, such as economics, agriculture, micro-enterprise, accounting, business or entrepreneurship. Volunteers are also required to have a reasonable level of fitness and volunteer on the project for a minimum duration of 3 weeks.
Sunday, January 27, 2019
From the beginning of our planning, Cassie and I knew volunteering would be a part of our trip .We didn’t quite know where at first, but we knew we wanted to give back in some way. We decided to teach English in the land of the Himalayas, and we can’t think of a better place to volunteer. Here are 5 reasons why you should volunteer in Nepal. 1) The Need To Volunteer In Nepal This is the most important reason by far. We volunteer because we see someone or some people in need. As much as we encourage everyone to travel, we know that not everyone is able to, especially not in third world countries. To give back to the world that allowed us to travel, we knew we had to volunteer. Cassie loved every second of teaching We chose Nepal because it sounded exciting – teaching English to Buddhist monks in a monastery. And it certainly was exciting. But we also saw how much Nepal needs volunteers. Whether it’s teaching English or offering medical care or anything else, the country and the people truly benefit from the generosity of volunteers. 2) Your Spare Time We had enough to do in our spare time in Nepal to fill every weekend… for a year. Pokhara – where we spent 5 weeks – is the third biggest city in Nepal, and is a haven for outdoor adventurers from all over Asia and Europe. (It remains largely undiscovered by Americans.) Got a spare morning? Watch the sun rise over the Himalayas. Want to hike? Bike? Paragide? Boat? Trek? Fly? Go on a jungle safari? It’s all there and more. Want to just relax at a guest house and spend your weekends eating and drinking? You can do that too at the hundreds of restaurants in Lakeside, the tourist district in Pokhara. Best of all… 3) Everything Is Inexpensive It may not be that cheap to get to Nepal (depending on where you’re coming from), but once you’re there, you can live like a king. We paid for an “expensive” hotel room and it cost all of $10.00. You can eat a full meal for less than $2.00. In fact, the only thing that’s even remotely expensive is alcohol. A beer still costs a few dollars – not as much as Western prices, but probably the most expensive thing on the menu. Even all of the aforementioned outdoor activities are dirt cheap compared to what you’d pay in a Western country. 4) The Nicest People There are some things in Nepal that will take you time to get used to. Like the honking. And the spitting. But once you realize those are simply a part of the culture, Nepali people are some of the most open, welcoming, generous people we’ve had the privilege of meeting. Our host family gave us anything we needed during our time with them, and any other family would’ve done the same. Our incredible host family. Nepalis love visitors, and often times, a random stranger on the road would strike up a conversation to make sure we were enjoying our time in Nepal. Where else do you find that kind of heart? 5) The Surroundings This one should be self-explanatory. You’re in the middle of the Himalayas. THE FREAKING HIMALAYAS. The highest mountains in the world cross right through Nepal. 8 of the world’s 10 tallest mountains grace the horizon and offer a naturally beautiful view every time you look up. You need to see the Himalayas with your own eyes at least once. No other mountain range in the world comes close. Not the Alps. Not the Rockys. And not the Andes. This is the icing on the cake in terms of reasons to volunteer, but when you see Annapurna 1 (26,545 feet) or Mt. Everest (29,029 feet) with your own eyes, you’ll know exactly what I mean when you volunteer in Nepal.
Wednesday, August 15, 2018
5 Reasons Why You Should Volunteer In Nepal By Oren and Cassie   From the beginning of our planning, Cassie and I knew volunteering would be a part of our RTW trip We didn’t quite know where at first, but we knew we wanted to give back in some way. We decided to teach English in the land of the Himalayas, and we can’t think of a better place to volunteer. Here are 5 reasons why you should volunteer in Nepal. 1) The Need To Volunteer In Nepal     This is the most important reason by far. We volunteer because we see someone or some people in need. As much as we encourage everyone to travel, we know that not everyone is able to, especially not in third world countries. To give back to the world that allowed us to travel, we knew we had to volunteer.   We chose Nepal because it sounded exciting – teaching English to Buddhist monks in a monastery. And it certainly was exciting. But we also saw how much Nepal needs volunteers. Whether it’s teaching English or offering medical care or anything else, the country and the people truly benefit from the generosity of volunteers.   2) Your Spare Time   We had enough to do in our spare time in Nepal to fill every weekend… for a year. Pokhara – where we spent 5 weeks – is the third biggest city in Nepal, and is a haven for outdoor adventurers from all over Asia and Europe. (It remains largely undiscovered by Americans.)     Want to hike? Bike? Paragide? Boat? Trek? Fly? Go on a jungle safari? It’s all there and more. Want to just relax at a guest house and spend your weekends eating and drinking? You can do that too at the hundreds of restaurants in Lakeside, the tourist district in Pokhara. Best of all…     3) Everything Is Inexpensive It may not be that cheap to get to Nepal (depending on where you’re coming from), but once you’re there, you can live like a king. We paid for an “expensive” hotel room and it cost all of $10.00. You can eat a full meal for less than $2.00. In fact, the only thing that’s even remotely expensive is alcohol. A beer still costs a few dollars – not as much as Western prices, but probably the most expensive thing on the menu. Even all of the aforementioned outdoor activities are dirt cheap compared to what you’d pay in a Western country.   4) The Nicest People   There are some things in Nepal that will take you time to get used to. Like the honking. And the spitting. But once you realize those are simply a part of the culture, Nepali people are some of the most open, welcoming, generous people we’ve had the privilege of meeting. Our host family gave us anything we needed during our time with them, and any other family would’ve done the same. Nepalis love visitors, and often times, a random stranger on the road would strike up a conversation to make sure we were enjoying our time in Nepal. Where else do you find that kind of heart? 5) The Surroundings This one should be self-explanatory. You’re in the middle of the Himalayas. THE FREAKING HIMALAYAS. The highest mountains in the world cross right through Nepal. 8 of the world’s 10 tallest mountains grace the horizon and offer a naturally beautiful view every time you look up. You need to see the Himalayas with your own eyes at least once. No other mountain range in the world comes close. Not the Alps. Not the Rockys. And not the Andes. This is the icing on the cake in terms of reasons to volunteer, but when you see Annapurna 1 (26,545 feet) or Mt. Everest (29,029 feet) with your own eyes, you’ll know exactly what I mean when you volunteer in Nepal. www.alliance-nepal.org